Right to Farm Laws Necessary

Jamie Johansen

New Holland ZimmPollOur latest ZimmPoll asked the question, “What do you think of Right to Farm laws?”

This ZimmPoll struck very close to home for me. As a Missouri farmer, I did what I could to help educate everyone I knew on the truths about the Right to Farm amendment that took a narrow victory earlier this month. I was excited to see that the majority of pollers thought laws such as these were needed to ensure the right to farm for generations to come. I believe we will see more and more states taking action to protect farmers. In my opinion it is a necessity.

Here are the poll results:

  • Necessary to save farming – 47%
  • Not necessary – 16%
  • Too dangerous – 14%
  • Maybe some states- 5%
  • Should be federal law – 8%
  • no opinion – 10%

Our new ZimmPoll is now live and asks the question, What’s the most important skill set for ag communications?

College campuses across the country are flooded with students heading to class. With that in mind, we want to know what you feel is the most important skill agriculture communications students need to have mastered when they enter the workforce. Is it still the traditional writing/editing skills or more current social media/blogging skills that employees are seeking?

ZimmPoll

Comments 2

  1. As assistant editor at an ag newspaper, I see a lot of people who want to make the transition from blogging to print. My advice is to learn the basics. If you can write and edit, you can blog and do social media in a respectable manner. If your blogs and posts are full of errors and are poorly constructed, it doesn’t matter how clever or timely they are. I feel like respectable communications need to account both tradition and trends.
    And if you’re going to be writing press releases (nearly every communications position involve PRs), learn to write news articles. Learn AP style. Take a journalism class. PRs are FREE publicity and a lot of ag publications run them, but we’re a lot more likely to use them if they’re well-written, sound like news articles, rather than PRs, and follow AP style (if that’s the style the pub uses). The less work we have to do to get them in the publication, the happier we will be to run them.
    In summary, don’t choose between learning about the “bones” of good writing and the “cosmetics” of blogging and social media technique. Learn both.

  2. As assistant editor at an ag newspaper, I see a lot of people who want to make the transition from blogging to print. My advice is to learn the basics. If you can write and edit, you can blog and do social media in a respectable manner. If your blogs and posts are full of errors and are poorly constructed, it doesn’t matter how clever or timely they are. I feel like respectable communications need to account both tradition and trends.
    And if you’re going to be writing press releases (nearly every communications position involve PRs), learn to write news articles. Learn AP style. Take a journalism class. PRs are FREE publicity and a lot of ag publications run them, but we’re a lot more likely to use them if they’re well-written, sound like news articles, rather than PRs, and follow AP style (if that’s the style the pub uses). The less work we have to do to get them in the publication, the happier we will be to run them.
    In summary, don’t choose between learning about the “bones” of good writing and the “cosmetics” of blogging and social media technique. Learn both.

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